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Posts3Likes2Joined18/1/2022Location

The Spanish verb llamar means to call. When conjugated for the first person singular, it becomes llamo. Therefore, when someone says “Me llamo…”, they are saying “My name is…”

The word nombre means name. Thus, when a person says Mi nombre es…”, they are introducing themselves with “My name is…”

The purpose of both phrases is the same – to inform the person on the other of the communication of one’s name. The usage of either phrase is correct. 

While both are commonly used, mi nombre es is taken to be more formal. Me llamo is conversational, while mi nombre es is regarded as more appropriate for written communication.

A third phrase – Soy or Yo soy – can also be used for introductions. It is the least formal. It is the first person conjugation of the verb ser – to be. It translates to I am.

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Posts3Likes2Joined18/1/2022Location

It was my early stages of Spanish learning, and I happened to be in Chile then. I confused the waiter at the cafe with my usage of "Mucho Gusto". I pointed toward the cake served and said mucho gusto multiple times. The waiter was puzzled and I was as puzzled as he was. Later a friend explained the phrase to me. The literal translation of the phrase “Mucho gusto” would be “I like it very much”. However, it is commonly used as a greeting that means “Nice to meet you”, or “It is a pleasure to meet you”.  

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Posts3Likes2Joined18/1/2022Location

The difference between “Bonsoir” and “Bonne Soirée" is minute - In English, “bonsoir” means “good evening”. It is used in place of “hi”, “hello” or other such expressions to greet a person you talk to or see in the evening, or more specifically, after 6pm. “Bonne soirée” can be translated as “have a nice evening”. It is used to bid farewell to a person when the parting is taking place during the evening.

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