leosmith's recent posts

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Time for an update. I have been in Thailand now for two weeks. I had a terrible case of amoebas (something I ate probably) the last couple weeks in the Philippines, and the swimming pool pump broke, which closed it down. After being sick and without exercise for two weeks, I was quite happy to leave Manila.

Although my goal was to finish it in Manila, the editor of Tagalog Lite was so busy that he couldn’t check it consistently during that time. But he has scheduled some time for it each week, and we are about halfway through the final check. It’s really looking good. He has now figured out a lot of complicated grammar issues that neither of us could explain very well before. When I say complicated, I mean it’s hard to explain, but still very high frequency.

I reached a bit of a milestone in my Mandarin reading spurt. I’m spending 2-3 hours a day on it, including reviews. Up until a week ago I was adding exactly 40 words per day, and only reading up to that point (plus re-reading the previous day’s segment). I would start in one passage, and finish in another. But a week ago I noticed the unknown words had dropped, and I made the decision to read a complete new passage every day, regardless of the unknown words. The first day was under 40, then I had 3 days over 40 (one was a whopping 54), so I wondered if I’d made the right decision. However, the last 4 passages were under 40, so I’m now sure things have settled down. My routine has simplified. Every day I do my anki reviews, read the previous day’s passage, read the new passage, memorize the new words and export them to anki.

Today was day 75 (not counting skipped days), and I finished passage 40. There are 100 passages total, so I will finish in 60 days at this pace. My reading has improved dramatically. My goal is to get the unknown words below 10%. I started in the mid 30’s, now I’m in the low 20’s.

I’ve also become interested in reading speed. In a Chinese Forums post, I saw people comparing reading speeds. Natives speak about 250 cpm (characters per minute), and this matches our Chinese Conversations. So in addition the 10% unknown words, I’m setting a goal of half native speed. Passages are 6 minutes long, so my goal is 12 min, first read. I tested it a while back, and I did 18 min, but that was my third read. I will do more testing as I go along.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Note: here are all the languages we have in work. These can all be found in the Reading Tool. 

Swahili – 135 conversation (complete)

Tagalog – 110 conversations (complete)

Cantonese – 100 conversations (complete)

French - 101 conversations (complete)

Russian - 100 conversations (complete)

Spanish - 100 conversations (complete)

Mandarin - 100 conversations (complete)

Thai - 100 (complete)

Italian - 100 (complete)

Brazilian Portuguese - 100 (complete)

English - 50 (stopped work)

German - 50 (stopped work)

Cebuano - 28 (stopped work)

South African English - 10 conversations (complete)

Japanese - 1 (stopped work)


You may have heard me say from time to time that if your highest priority is conversing in your L2, then conversation should be your most valued source for learning. I’m not saying it should be the only source, but pound per pound I believe it’s the best source.


To be fair, I think it does depend on what stage you’re in. Beginners may not have the skills required to do what I’m suggesting. Also, this stage goes by quickly and seems to be handled nicely by the wealth of beginner learning material out there. Advanced learners may already be very good communicators and everyday conversation might not tax them enough. In addition, they are much more likely to use native material to improve. The remainder is the period I’m talking about – the long intermediate slog. That’s when I suggest learners should really focus on conversation.


Here’s an example of what I’m recommending: taking notes during a conversation, writing down items your partner says that you don’t understand, writing down things you didn’t know how to say, and memorizing/reviewing these items before your next conversation. I’ve found this to be my single most effective exercise to improve my vocabulary and grammar in actual conversations. 


But what about reading and listening? It probably doesn’t surprise you that I recommend reading transcripts of and listening to actual conversations. I think it’s more effective for improving your conversation than reading and listening to non-conversation items (news, books, TV scripts, text messages, etc). Don’t get me wrong – there is a time and place for reading and listening to those things and they are very helpful. I’m not going to get into the other items here; read and listen to everything but let the core of your method be conversations if your main goal is to improve your conversation. 


The problem is – where do you get these conversations? You could have your personal conversations transcribed and recorded so that you could read and listen to them. That’s a good start, but it’s a pretty time-consuming task. Also, vocab/grammar would be limited compared to a conversation between two native speakers, so it may be better suited to the beginner period. And as I said above, the beginner period is handled pretty well with existing beginner materials.


That’s why we’ve created LT Conversations. These are conversations between two native speakers. We use a mixture of female-male, female-female and male-male for variety, but each conversation is between two native speakers and about six minutes long. We make 100 of these for each language selected, which gives you about 10 hours of reading and listening to actual conversations. I hope this will be enough to prepare the learner for real native material. To be clear, I’m not saying I expect the learner to understand native material completely after finishing LT conversations; my goal is that they will have the base needed to start to dig into native material designed by natives for natives. In theory, “learning” material should no longer be required.  


While creating these, I had a hard time trying to figure out whether they were intermediate or advanced. I settled on intermediate mainly because it’s pretty much impossible to get people to talk to each other normally while covering the things I want them to cover, not talk on top of each other, not use loanwords and speak clearly without some reduction in difficulty. The voice actors tend to create some sort of script to satisfy all of my requirements, even though I’ve asked them not to. I could probably work with teams more closely and intensively to get a more advance product, but that would be more expensive and time consuming, so they are what they are. Good intermediate conversations.


Now I should mention that one of the sweetest things about these conversations is that they’re located in our reading tool already to go. Put your cursor over a word and a definition will pop up; click it and it will change state and color and you can add new definitions. This makes reading much more accessible. As I hinted above, this reading/listening is meant to be just a component of your learning method. I recommend that if you’re going to be memorizing and reviewing vocabulary and grammar you should get them from your personal conversations. But that’s not to say you can’t do it with these conversations - you can go into your own vocabulary database in the reading tool, manicure it, export it to anki etc, if that’s what you want to do. But I personally prefer to let the mouseover definitions and shading do the work for me, read as seamlessly as possible without too many interruptions, and put my memorizing and reviewing efforts into my personal conversations. 

Edited

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

wrote:
TTS is missing for the vocabulary review section on the website, but is present in the Android app.

Added.

Edited

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

That's strange. Can you post a screenshot of the issue?

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

I see two above the a. What is your browser/os/device?

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

thanks - ticket written

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

This is for the reading tool. It pulls word definitions from Google Translate, but it will also have the option of giving you definitions from your favorite dictionaries. So if you have suggestions of dictionaries to add, please list them here.


Complied list:


Cantonese

http://www.cantonese.sheik.co.uk/scripts/parse_chinese.php


Cebuano

http://www.bohol.ph/wced.php


Dutch

https://glosbe.com/nl/en


English

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary


French

http://www.wordreference.com/fren

https://www.linguee.com/english-french

https://fr.wiktionary.org/wiki/Wiktionnaire:Page_d%E2%80%99accueil


German

https://dict.leo.org/german-english

https://en.pons.com/

https://tureng.com/en/german-english/

https://www.linguee.com/english-german

https://www.dict.cc/


Hebrew

https://www.morfix.co.il/en/


Hindi

https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english-hindi 

https://en.bab.la/ 

http://dsal.uchicago.edu/dictionaries/caturvedi/ 

http://hindi-english.org/ 

https://www.shabdkosh.com/ 


Hungarian

https://topszotar.hu/magyarangol/ 


Indonesian

https://www.kamus.net/


Italian

https://context.reverso.net/translation/italian-english

https://www.wordreference.com/iten


Japanese

https://jisho.org

http://www.edrdg.org/cgi-bin/wwwjdic/wwwjdic


Korean

http://dic.daum.net/index.do?dic=eng

https://ko.dict.naver.com/


Mandarin

https://www.mdbg.net/chinese/dictionary

https://www.yellowbridge.com/chinese/chinese-dictionary.php


Nahuatl

https://nahuatl.wired-humanities.org

https://gdn.iib.unam.mx


Portuguese

https://dicionario.priberam.org/

https://www.dicio.com.br/

https://www.linguee.com/english-portuguese

https://www.infopedia.pt/dicionarios/lingua-portuguesa


Spanish

http://www.thai-language.com/dict

http://www.spanishdict.com/dictionary

http://dle.rae.es/

http://www.wordreference.com/

https://es.thefreedictionary.com/

http://context.reverso.net/translation/spanish-english/


Russian

http://www.wordreference.com/ruen

https://ru.wiktionary.org/wiki/слово

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/слово

https://context.reverso.net/translation/russian-english/

https://de.langenscheidt.com/russisch-deutsch/слово

https://dict.leo.org/russisch-deutsch/слово

https://de.pons.com/%C3%BCbersetzung/russisch-deutsch/слово


Swahili

https://africanlanguages.com/swahili/

https://en.bab.la/dictionary/swahili-english/siku

https://glosbe.com/sw/en


Scottish Gaelic

https://learngaelic.net/dictionary/index.jsp


Tagalog

https://www.filipinolessons.com/dictionary


Thai

http://www.thai-language.com/dict

https://www.thai2english.com/

https://www.clickthai-online.de/wbtde/woerterbuch.php


Turkish

https://tureng.com/en/turkish-english/


Vietnamese

https://glosbe.com/vi/en


Zulu

https://isizulu.net/



Edited

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

bbyj wrote:
Hello can you please add Glosbe for Dutch? Thank you!!
Added.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Jacob.M wrote:
On the website when I try to switch from single page to multi-page view. I have to open and close the menu twice for the change to take effect.On the mobile website it shows the "Login" button at the top of the page when I first open it, which is a bit confusing because I am already logged in when I click on the reading tool.
Also, TTS is missing for the vocabulary review section on the website, but is present in the Android app.

Thanks! I wrote a ticket to address these.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

HolaIsabel wrote:
When I click the dictionary symbol it opens a pop up with Priberam and it doesn't show any other dictionary options
For Spanish translations, there should be 2 dictionaries, priberam and dicio. What is your OS/browser?

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

I have a confession to make – I was wrong about something that I’ve believed for a long time. I believed that if you are going to systematically memorize and review vocabulary and grammar from content that you consume, it is always better to do L1 to L2 reviews. Actually, I have always done both L1 to L2 and L2 to L1 reviews just to be safe, but I believed that L2 to L1 were not very important, and the ability to understand the L2 items would happen naturally, provided I did L1 to L2. In my defense, if you are only interested in conversation and writing, I still believe this is correct.


But I consider myself to be a well-rounded language learner, and it turns out that L2 to L1 reviews are very important for reading. You might be thinking “so what – you are doing both anyway, so you are covered”. Reviewing both ways isn’t necessarily a bad idea, unless you are trying to learn to read as quickly as possible. L1 to L2 reviews require much greater recall effort than L2 to L1, imo at least twice as much, so doing reviews both ways takes at least 3 times as much time as just L2 to L1. And this hardcore recall work is something that you should limit when you study – doing too much makes people want to quit.


I may have never figured this out, since most languages have not required me to do intensive reading. With most languages, I was able to just read extensively in the reading tool, noting pop-up definitions of unknown words, and became comfortable reading in a few dozen hours. But recently I decided to fix the biggest hole in my proficiency of all 10 foreign languages. I decided to keep reading Mandarin intensively until I know more than 90% of new texts at first glance. When I started, I was at an appalling 65%, so extensive reading by itself was not cutting it.


When I started this exercise, I decided to try to memorize/review every new word that I came across, since I was using a very trustworthy source. Mandarin Conversations are 100% natural conversations, with very little if any strange vocabulary/grammar, so I am not concerned about usefulness. I tried to do 20 new words per day, both L1 to L2 and L2 to L1, and it very quickly became hard to stay on top of.


I have read many posts of learners disregarding L1 to L2 reviews when learning to read, but never believed it would work for me. Seeing over a month of my precious time slip away with very slow progress, I decided to make the leap and give it a try. I ditched the L1 to L2 reviews, and increased the load to 40 words per day. Surprisingly, even after doubling the word count, after a couple weeks of this, review time is significantly less than the previous method, and it feels less intense.


Bottom line, if you are just trying to improve you reading in a language that uses Chinese characters, doing L2 to L1 reviews only is an efficient way to maximize the number of new words you can assimilate per day.  


So why does this make me feel so good? Shouldn’t I be embarrassed about telling people to never skip L1 to L2 reviews? Sure, but it’s not worth dwelling on such things, and the big picture reveals something much more important. My poor reading skills in Mandarin and Japanese were the main reasons why I thought I’d never be able to reach advanced levels in all my languages simultaneously. I thought it would take thousands of hours, and wasn’t willing to sacrifice that time. Now I’m looking at a few hundred hours, so the dream of C1+ in all my languages is alive again!  

Edited

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

almuvo wrote:
Displaying the current/last language being read at the moment perhaps?
Oh - you are talking about the app, right? I'll bring this up at our next meeting.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Thanks for your kind comments!

HolaIsabel wrote:
the front page isn't very apealing
Any ideas for a more appealing front page? 

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

HolaIsabel wrote:
when i click that book symbol it opens a pop up, that's why I wasn't finding the setting to change it...
I didn't understand your comment, because the settings gear is in a different location. Are you saying that the site is behaving different from the video?

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

HolaIsabel wrote:
How can I choose the default dictionary among the options? and to make it open by default?
Please see this video.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Jacob.M wrote:
Yes, it would be nice for whole pages. Right now, I just go back and listen to the whole article in Edge.

Hi Jacob, just a quick update/some questions on your items in work.

1) Remembering page number across devices is tricky because the number of words per page changes. We can make the bookmarked word always be in the current page - would that help?

2) Regarding TTS for a whole page - is this for passages that have no audio? Or is it just because it's easier than trying to play the recording for a specific page using the playback bar? We're just trying to see the value of adding this feature.

3) We are still working on the Thai rendering issue in the native app. We would like to delay fixing the mobile browser definition issue, so that we can concentrate our resources on the app. Is that a game-changer for you?

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

bbyj wrote:
Hello
The linking issue with Vietnamese was totally fixed in the last thread and it's awesome now. Though, I noticed this functionality is not present in the app on Android. Can this be added?
Thanks!

Hi b - just to clarify, join/split are not available on the app, so we are looking into adding them. That's what you are requesting here, right? 

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Thanks - I've written a ticket.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

ok, we'll consider this

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Jacob.M wrote:
It would be nice if it would remember my page number when reading across multiple devices.Text-to-Speech would be nice for the reading tool. I'd like to markup the current page and then listen to the whole page.

I'll bring up remembering page number across devices, but I think we discussed this previously and found it to be too difficult to implement. Regarding text to speech - you are aware that we have it for individual words/phrases, and are just requesting something like a TTS button for whole pages, right?

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Jacob.M wrote:
Thai script isn't rendered correctly.

Thanks - I wrote a ticket for this one.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Thanks Jinx! I copied one of you passages to test this out, so that may be the overwriting issue; not sure about that though. If the original issue happens in any new texts, please let us know.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

This is the the "head and shoulders knees and toes" song that we hear in so many languages. Cool.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Joseph.Adams wrote:
Also I know the mobile app is essentially the website but if there was a way to have Audio/Playlist control from my notifications (play, pause, next, time position) that would be amazing too

Hi Joseph, we think we fixed this - can you please confirm?

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Jinx wrote:
No problem, I've been on the other side of the tech support "table" before, so I like to try to supply y'all with as much helpful data as possible :)

Hi Jinx,

I think it's fixed now - can you please verify?

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

bbyj wrote:
Thank you so much I look forward to seeing the result.

I think we fixed this - can you please confirm?

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

GermanPolyglot wrote:
This is the secret to overcoming the plateau: pick one topic, become fluent in it, pick another topic, become fluent in it, pick a third topic, become fluent in it... until there are no more topics that are useful/interesting to you at this time.
This is called "Building up your Islands" by Boris Shekhtman in his excellent How to Improve Your Foreign Language Immediately.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

bbyj wrote:
Is it possible to "link" words without removing the space between them?

I didn't realize this was an issue for Vietnamese. I will write a ticket to see if it can be fixed.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Vitor. wrote:
What do you mean when you say "watch videos/tv series at least 30 minutes a day ? Is this to get used to the sounds of the language? Because as a beginner you don't have enough vocabulary to do it, right?
Yes, to get used to the the sounds of the language. And you need to start doing it eventually, so you you may as well jump in. Who knows - you may understand more than you thought you would. Only native material is going to get you used to native speed and vocabulary.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Oh wow, thanks for checking so thoroughly! Sorry that it still isn't fixed. I forwarded your post to the technical team. 

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Jinx wrote:
I've noticed that sometimes one word in a text I'm reading will appear as a completely different random word
Hi Jinx, we think we've fixed this. Our technical team says "she'll need to edit slightly/save again to see the update". Can you please verify that it's working now?

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

That's possible, but this site has many functions, not just the reading tool. I don't think that stat belongs in that location.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

It might be harder to implement for people learning multiple languages.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

almuvo wrote:
Hello I'm trying the app on android and the audio stops when turning off the screen or switching apps. I saw the issue in the second post, was it fixed? Do I have to do something else? Thanks a lot, otherwise the app is great.
edit: I tried to read or listen offline with the app and it said that it was offline. Is this a premium feature? Thanks

We created a ticket to address the first issue - it was fixed previously; sorry about that.

The second issue, to read/listen offline is not supported, downloading audio is free, and downloading transcripts is premium.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

I’m about to start my travels again. To make a long story short, there was extensive water damage to my condo and it will take weeks to properly repair, so I decided to avoid the demolition/construction. I will go the Philippines first because I’m finishing up the book (still in editing) and I want a nice, low-pressure place to stay for a couple months to continue with this Chinese reading exercise in the afternoons. China and Taiwan are still closed due to the pandemic. I would have liked to have gone to Brazil for a month to practice my Portuguese, but that would mean I’d be doing spurts in two languages at once, which can be stressful.


I leave in a three days, I just finished the last day (day 20) of this exercise before travelling, and wanted to report on it. It may take longer that I thought. I’m on the fifth conversation, and it will probably wind up being a 5 day passage. I thought I’d be down to 3 or even 2 days per passage by now. I was hoping that by the end of the first month I’d be doing 1 passage per day.

conversation 1: 5 days   

conversation 2: 4 days   

conversation 3: 4 days   

conversation 4: 4 days 

 

There is some good news though. First, unknown (unique) words is in the mid 20’s for these passages. It was in the mid 30’s when I started doing this, which may have been because I was looking at harder materials. But regardless, it’s nice to know that it’s in the same difficulty range as Japanese.


The other good news is that my Anki reps aren’t spinning out of control. I’ve done 20 days in a row, except for one day off, and my reps are taking about 40 min/day. I wanted it be below 1 hr/day by the time I finished 1 month, and it looks like that would have happened even without this forced break coming up due to travel. I’ll be working on this for 2 months in the Philippines, then 2.5 months in Thailand, so hopefully that will be enough to finish it.  

Edited

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

We are very similar - your whole post resonated with me, which is pretty rare. I think we are doing the right thing by creating that list of words/expressions ourselves because learning resources are always off for some reason (not colloquial, not up to date, etc). Getting vocab/phrases from actual conversations rocks.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

GermanPolyglot wrote:
On average I spend about a week using self-study materials before I'm ready to start practicing conversations with a tutor, sometimes two weeks if I'm slow.

I commend you for that! I consider myself pretty aggressive when it come to starting conversation, but you start even faster than me. Historically, I've put in 2-3 months of study before starting with a tutor. After that, I meet with tutors for 1 hour per day, every day. The conversations are 100% L2, and I ask them only to correct big/obvious mistakes. I want to focus on conversation at that time, and because I'm studying so much on my own, I can normally catch my own mistakes. When I learned Brazilian Portuguese, I started conversing after only 3 weeks. Thank you Spanish!

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Thanks! The ticket is in work, but this additional passage may help them.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Thanks very much for providing that - strange indeed! I was able to reproduce it, and have written a ticket. We'll keep you posted.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

GermanPolyglot wrote:
To pass level 1 or even 2, you only have to recognize a word, not actively know it.
This is the type of thing that makes Duo a poor choice for most learners imo, so it's good to hear they are addressing it. 

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Jinx wrote:
Any ideas what could be going on?

Hi Jinx - we're really sorry about that. I've never seen this before - can you give me a link to this passage, or any passage where it seems to happen repeatedly? Also, can you remind me of your browser/version/platform?

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

SRS (Spaced Repetition software) has become very popular in language learning circles these days. Discussions about SRS, and more specifically, Anki (a certain brand of SRS) are seen everywhere language learning is discussed; in fact it’s pretty much impossible to avoid seeing them. In this post I’m going to give a simple explanation of SRS and why it has become so popular. I will warn against overusing it, and finally, suggest ways to safely incorporate it into your language learning plan.


Simple explanation of SRS, and why it’s so popular

SRS is flashcard software that is designed to have you review your vocabulary just when you need to. 

With paper flashcards and word lists, you decide when to review your vocabulary. But some words you know really well, so you don’t need to review them as often. Other words you’ve already forgotten, so it would be better to review them more often. SRS remembers whether you passed or failed a card (you select “pass” or “fail” when you finish a card), and uses an algorithm to predict when you need to review it again. So in theory SRS will save you time, and use your time more effectively.


Now some people don’t like to do this type of additional vocabulary study; they prefer to learn vocabulary through context. For example, they might prefer to read for 1 hour, rather than read 45 min and do flash cards for 15 min. But for everyone else, you can probably see how attractive SRS is. It’s convenient; you can do it on your phone in your free time anywhere. And it’s efficient because of its intelligently spaced reviews. 


And to be fair, SRS is more complicated than I mentioned, and can do much more that users find attractive. For example, you are not just limited to vocabulary. You can create your own cards with whole sentences if you want. You can use it to learn grammar, add audio, add video, automatically create “fill in the blanks” type cards, create cards that have multiple sides, etc. These features make SRS even more attractive to enthusiasts.  


Overusing SRS

So with all the advantages and features mentioned above, how is it possible to overuse SRS? Here are some pitfalls of overuse. 


It can work against our goals in learning a language.

Most people want to be able converse well, and to be able to read at a reasonable speed. Many would like to understand movies and TV, and write well. Goals vary from person to person, but most people agree that at some point they’d like to be able to do these things without needing props like SRS anymore. Yes, there are some who say they plan on using it for the rest of their lives, but those people are rare. So the goal is not SRS; SRS is merely a tool to help you achieve your goal. 


Now let’s imagine a time in the future when you have reached your goal and are using the language well, as intended, without SRS, and work backwards. It should come as no surprise that it takes a lot of practice using the language without props like SRS before you become good at it. So you want to stop using SRS long before you reach your goal, or at least have weaned yourself off it to the point where you have the time you need to practice the real language. 


Conclusion - if your goal is to use the language without SRS, it doesn’t make sense to use it all the time and drop it at the last minute, expecting to miraculously not need it anymore. Using it too much and too long works against our goals.


It can cause dissociation, decrease motivation, make you want to quit and instill depression.

It’s clear to me that spending so much time away from what you really want out of a language leads to dissociation, makes you lose motivation and want to quit. I’ve read dozens of posts from people who have complained about this, met some of these students in person, and have suffered from it myself. Seeing a dream crushed after hundreds of hours of study can cause depression, believe it or not.


There are very few individuals that have what it takes to learn a language while using a method that is chiefly SRS usage. Case in point – the 10,000 sentence method, that is the method formerly pushed heavily by AJATT and thousands of Japanese learners. If I believe what I read on the internet from these learners, it was a massive failure for most people. It killed motivation, made people quit, and caused depression, on a large scale.


Conclusion – don’t use SRS so much that you lose contact with the thing you love and want most; the real language. You need time to converse, read, watch movies, etc. Otherwise you run the real risk of quitting and/or being depressed.


How to use SRS safely

According to what I stated above, we want limit the use of SRS enough to allow us sufficient time to practice and stay in touch with the pure language. There are many ways to do this, and I couldn’t possibly write about all methods here, so I’ll just share some of the principals that I follow.

• Limit your review sessions to 1 hour. This is a max, and it’s perfectly acceptable to do less.

• Limit your total SRS time, including reviews, card creation, etc, to less than 50% of your total study time in the beginning

• Limit your total SRS time, including reviews, card creation, etc, to less than 25% of your total study time after 2 months  

• Do all your repetitions, but delete cards older than one month. This is how you keep your sessions from exceeding 1 hour. 

• Don’t spend too much time making and manicuring your cards. You’ll only use them for a month, after all. 

• Delete problem cards mercilessly


The point about deleting cards older than 1 month is what scares most over-users. Remember this – you don’t want SRS to take over your studies, so you are trying to get as much benefit as possible out of a 1 hr review. You will get more bang for your buck by sacrificing the old cards rather than the new. New cards are fresh and more fun. Wordbrain also recommends reviewing vocabulary for only 1 month. For cards that have been in the SRS for 1 month, if you know them well, they don’t need to be in there; better to replace them with new cards which do need to be there. For cards that have been in the SRS for 1 month, if you don’t know them well, leaving them in there longer won’t help; better to replace them with new cards. It’s very normal and acceptable to put cards in that you’ve already deleted from your SRS previously.


If you follow these principals, your SRS should be of great benefit to you. Limiting it’s usage will leave you time to work with the real language and help you avoid depression.


One final warning.

Even with the massive failure of the 10,000 sentence method mentioned above, SRS has become much more wide spread in the past few years. Although most use it in a reasonable way, there are many quite vocal fans who are what I’d call over-users. Unfortunately I fear we can expect to see another surge and large-scale fallout over the next few years, due to the release of Gabriel Wyner's book Fluent Forever in 2014. This book describes how to learn a language using (over-using by my way of thinking) SRS. The method is very similar to the original 10,000 sentence method in many respects, but has much more detail regarding creation of material for and usage of Anki, the SRS of choice for most language users.


Most readers are probably unaware of the fate of the 10,000 sentence method. The book is well organized, professional, cites several studies in support of SRS, and uses a lot of friendly colloquial language that younger learners can relate to. Basically, the book is very attractive for many reasons, which makes it hard to warn people about. I can only hope that this post will persuade people not to follow his method.


Edited

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

This is some good information. I started using SRSs in 2005, with Supermemo. Back then, people didn't really understand what it was, and they thought I was insane for using it. It had a really steep learning curve, I mean, learning how to use it. But it was so much better than what I used to do - review words in a notebook full of vocabulary lists. Anki was a big improvement over Supermemo, with a lot more features, cross platform and shared decks. In the early years of Anki, there was this big surge of popularity amongst Japanese learners. To make a long story short, they overestimated and overused it, resulting in a temporary crash in popularity in that group. There are still many over-users of Anki these days, and I warned about it in this blog post.

Edited

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

It took me 5 days to get through the first 6-minute conversation. Number of new words were as follows:

day 1 = 26

day 2 = 20

day 3 = 20

day 4 = 17

day 5 = 12

I started the second conversation today, and added 21 new words. I wanted to get past 1/4th of the way through the passage, and I did. I expect this passage will take no more than 4 days, the next one 3 days, and the next one 2 days. I also expect to be reading whole passages before I finish 10 total, and I plan to only read one a day from then until I finish them. Anki reviews are building up, but not bad so far; maybe 10 minutes. I’m going to document my procedure here, for possible future use:


1)  do Anki reviews

2)  listen to audio for yesterday and today’s reading, reading along casually

3)  read yesterday and today’s reading

4)  memorize the unknown vocabulary, whether it is truly unknown or I merely couldn’t read it, and put in Anki

5)  listen to today’s reading, reading along casually

6)  read today’s reading

7)  listen to today’s reading without looking at text, trying hard to pick up everything


I’m not saying this is the right way to do it, but it seems to be working quite well so far, so I’ll stick with it.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

I decided to go with 2) b above. According to the stats in the reading tool, here are my approximate average percentages of unknown unique words after I finish reading a passage:

Spanish 5%

French 5%

Portuguese 7%

Tagalog 10%

Swahili 15%

Russian 15%

Thai 15%

Korean 15%

Japanese 25%

Mandarin 35%

Keep in mind that these stats would look much better if they were for non-unique words. That is because a few hundred very common words, which I already know, make up a majority of the words in a passage, and are repeated many times. But the numbers above clearly show the problem I have with Japanese and Mandarin reading. To make it worse, without tools, it is often impossible to even pronounce an unknown word in those languages, since Chinese characters may give no clues.


So I am working on my greatest weakness – reading Mandarin. I’ve decided to focus on simplified characters, since that is the most common. I will need to do traditional later. I will also need to do Japanese eventually. My goal is to get the unknown words under 10%. I don’t know how long this will take, but I will dedicate at least an hour a day to this until it gets resolved.


My first day at it was yesterday. I read some of passage 1 in Mandarin Conversations. I read until I saw that I had accumulated too many unknown words, and stopped. Then I put the words into a word list and memorized them. L2 to L1, then L1 to L2. Finally, I put them in Anki. Today I did the Anki reviews, then I reread yesterday’s reading. It was much easier. Next, I continued reading until I had about 20 unknown words, and repeated yesterday’s exercise. I think I’ll limit it to about 20 words per day. I hope that after a few weeks I’ll be able to read a whole passage before I hit 20 unknown words. (I am listening to the passages too – I didn’t add that here to avoid cluttering up the reading exercise)

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

It’s been 8 months since the last post; about time for an update. I finished the 4th draft of Tagalog Lite last month. Although it was a major change from the 3rd one, it only took 2 months to complete; far less that I expected. I don’t expect nearly as many corrections in editing this time.


I went to hand it off to the editor, and was told that he would not be available until September. So I decided to write a set of drills for each lesson. This was always part of the plan, although I intended to do it after editing. They consist of simple sentences that focus only on the specific lesson. They differ from the existing sample sentences, which try to maintain grammar from all lessons. These drills were requested by several reviewers after the 1st draft was posted online.


I finished writing the drills yesterday, still 2 weeks before the editor becomes available. Due to the increased size of the book, I predict it will take him a month to edit. So conservatively, I have a month and a half before I need to do anything else regarding the book.


So what to do now? I definitely want to do some language learning, and here are some ideas.

1)  Start a new language from my hitlist. The possibilities are German, Italian, Vietnamese, Cantonese, Malay, Cambodian, Cebuano, Arabic, Hindi.

2)  Improve existing languages.

a)   Improve conversation in all languages by doing 3 lessons per day and using my conversation improvement technique for all of them.

b)  Work on my biggest weakness – reading Chinese characters. Specifically, improve Mandarin and Japanese reading by reading a ton and memorizing definitions and pronunciations of unknown characters and compounds.

3)  Start a YouTube channel for answering common questions about language learning that come up frequently.

I could add more to the list, but I think that is enough to think about. I’ll try to make a decision today.


In closing, I want to share a positive experience that I had last night. After a long bicycle ride with a friend, I convinced him that we should watch “Beck”, a Japanese movie about a new band competing in a battle of the bands. He is a guitarist, and open minded about different cultures, so I thought he would like it. The sad thing about Beck is that it keeps getting taken down from YouTube. We found a version, but it was only dubbed in Portuguese, no English. He only speaks English, so he asked if I could translate, and I did. Half the time I was translating from Japanese, and half the time from Portuguese. But I did that simultaneous translating for the entire movie, and he said he understood it. It’s nice to feel my studies have value.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Clayton.Henderson wrote:
Hey Léo! How about English and Spanish. English is in huge demand globally, and so is Spanish. I know from being a long time fan your Spanish is quite advanced, and you're a native English speaker. I think the community could benefit from having some big languages to further enrich

Thanks, added. I'm considering adding complete English translations to all of them, but that's a bit expensive.

Edited

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

GermanPolyglot wrote:
There are two main considerations:
1. Interference
2. Efficiency

I’m really glad you brought this topic up because in another forum someone asked how many languages they can safely learn at once. Another person answered something like “two or three, depending on your situation” without really qualifying it. So to clarify, I stated “Conventional wisdom says only one at a time for languages lower than B2, provided the learner wants to reach B2 or better in all their languages as efficiently as possible”. Well, that was poking the hornet’s nest. In the next few posts I was labeled an ageist, gatekeeper and language snob.

But now I can point to your blog post as you have described in much greater detail the criteria for adding a language. As you say, it’s all about interference and efficiency. Cheers!   

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Unfortunately, that would be a brand new kind of entity. It can't be treated like a single word or phrase - it wouldn't show up the next time you saw it, or be highlighted, for example. If the site becomes more profitable, we can look at this again, but for the time being it would cost too much to implement. Sorry about that. 

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Actually, I see the tech team turned down a similar request in the past. Is this what you are talking about?

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

koko.raari wrote:
Well, when you say 'go into google translate', do you mean that it would open up a new tab?

Before I get too far ahead of myself, I don't know if this is even possible. But no, I meant "ruft an" would be what gets translated, rather than "Er ruft seine Freundin an". "anrufen" would not be translated - this is my main point of confusion, I want to make sure you are not expecting the program to "read ruft" an and know that you need "anfufen" translated.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

From your description, I can't tell exactly how this would work. I don't know if it's possible, but if we could enable multiple word selection using ctrl, those words would go into google translate. So "ruft an" would go into google translate. Is that what you want? When you explain, please keep in mind that I do not speak German.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Nat.Kovalenko wrote:
Ukrainian is one of the spreadest Slavic languages in the world, also it is one of the most melodious. I wish more people would speak it

Do you find that a lot more westerners are learning it now?

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

jeeyeung wrote:
Hey, could you add wordreference for Italian please? Thanks

Done

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

For example, through a futuristic telescope of some sort, can we look at the Earth's light reflected from a planet 10 light years away and see ourselves 20 years ago? This video got me thinking of it:



Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

GermanPolyglot wrote:
I think Heisig is hugely inefficient for Chinese (not Japanese) imho.
I actually don’t recommend it either, but for different reasons. I believe it is not efficient to try to keep any out-of-context wordlist, including and especially Chinese characters, alive in an Anki deck until one actually encounters them in real life, and starts to use them. Instead, I recommend that learners use the Heisig mnemonic method to learn characters as soon as they encounter them.


The thing is, "learning" those 3000 characters using a Hesig-like method is just the tip of the iceberg. One has to learn pronunciation/words too. And after that, every time one reads, writes, perhaps even visualizes the language, those characters slow them down compared to a language without characters. Considering that my personal experience, the experience of most advanced learners I read about and FSI all show that it takes 3 to 4 times as long to learn Mandarin/Japanese as a Cat I language, I think estimating the contribution of the characters at 1000+ hours is reasonable.

Edited

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

GermanPolyglot wrote:
Amazing, go you for creating a Tagalog grammar!!!
Thanks!

wrote:
I'm not sure Korean is easier than Mandarin for everyone, because Korean conjugation tables look intimidating and Chinese doesn't have any conjugation.
Yes, as I said, ymmv. But for me, except for the case of Tagalog, grammar doesn’t seem to effect the overall difficulty level of a language.

wrote:
50 hours total for the characters.
This is an underestimation imo; it’s even lower than the number of hours just to complete Heisig. The average learner seems to finish Heisig in about 200 hours, and the method works, but it’s only the tip of the iceberg. Most people can expect Chinese characters to contribute at least an additional 1000 hours to the learning of Mandarin and Japanese. I am upper intermediate in both languages. The 1000+ plus hours jibes with my experiences and the experiences of the majority of people who have reached a high level in the languages.

wrote:
I'm wondering if you just had very bad experiences with foreign alphabets.
I suppose this is possible, but my experiences are compatible with FSI, so I am probably not unusual in that regard.

wrote:
Russian and Thai writing are not straightforward - it's like saying the Latin alphabet is hard because English spelling is hard, but Spanish spelling makes this alphabet much easier.
Sorry, but I don’t follow.

wrote:
Try Greek or try Serbian (written in Cyrillic) and you'll probably find that the alphabet is no big deal. These languages would not belong in your category 3.
You might be right.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Although I have heard that babies, on the average, take about the same amount of time to learn their mother tongue regardless of the language, I agree that, for a given individual, some foreign languages are easier than others. For example, most native English speakers will find Spanish easier than Mandarin.

I also agree that “easier” should mean “less time consuming” here. Although some activities are more “intense” than others, it is hard (impossible?) to measure things like intensity, so using time as the metric makes more sense.

GermanPolyglot wrote:
The writing system itself need not be a reason to consider a language to be harder than another, provided the spelling is reasonably phonetic. That is, learning "Korean spelled in Latin letters" would take a few hours less than "Korean spelled in the Hangul alphabet", but as long as the writing system can be learned in a few hours (through my Script Hacking books for example), we need to examine whether the pronunciation, grammar and vocabulary are significantly easier than in the other language, so as to offset the extra few hours spent on the writing system.

I don’t believe this true in my case, though. Everyone has their own weaknesses when it comes to language learning, so ymmv. But for me, I don’t believe grammar is the hardest part overall. If it was, Russian would be my hardest language. But this is my ranking:

Portuguese/Spanish/French/Swahili < Tagalog < Russian/Thai/Korean < Mandarin/Japanese

Notice I’m only using four levels; it’s hard for me to say which is easiest within each group. So here is something I noticed for the first time this year – having a different (non Latin-based) script, even if it can be “learned in a few hours”, puts a language into the two hardest levels. This is not only true for my personal situation, but also applies to FSI rankings. If the language has a different script, it is automatically placed in cat 4 or 5, the hardest categories.

To be clear, I’m not saying the activity of quickly learning the script in order to start reading is the big time consumer. My theory is that the constant need to use a different script, when you read and perhaps even when you imagine words, slows you down considerably.  

Mandarin and Japanese, on the other hand, are in an even higher category because Chinese characters are so incredibly time consuming to learn. I am always baffled when someone claims languages like Korean belong in that category; it makes me think our brains are very different.   

Anyway, I guess I just described how I came up with my level 3 and 4. All languages with different scripts are level 3, unless they have Chinese characters, which puts them in level 4. But what about 1 and 2? Well, I think Tagalog is in 2 because it has much harder grammar than the level 1 languages. Tagalog’s difficulty is often underrated because native speakers usually speak English very well, and they code switch to English so often. That plus the fact that its grammar resources are so poor make it harder to learn. And that’s also why I’m writing a Tagalog grammar now. 

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

paan.ji wrote:
It's a very good idea to write down the new words you discover. Just by writing them down you will start to recognise the words when you read. Plus, keeping a dictionary of all your new words will give you the confidence to learn even more words -- especially when you can see how many new words you've already learnt.

The reading tool does this. Just go to the Vocabulary tab. You can also export your vocabulary to use in Anki, for example.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Antlers.Kvl wrote:
exotic languages are much more interesting to learn
If you are more motivated to learn "hard" languages than "easy" ones, then it makes sense to me that you find them easier.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

I'll just add a note for others who might read this - the export file is of a format that is readable by most SRSs.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

GermanPolyglot wrote:
Maybe "language aficionado" might be a better term?

I like this term! I actually think highly of "language hobbyist" too. Polyglot is a cool word to a native English speaker, because it's rarely used. But:   

wrote:
Less welcome are "Youtube polyglots": influencers who record videos saying "Hello! How are you?" in a bunch of languages and pretending that one can learn a language in a week (or: that all polyglottery is just a trick), devaluing the work of polyglots who have put years and years into their languages and actually reached high levels of fluency in multiple languages.

This has ruined the word for many people. They say things like "I hate polyglots" to target these shysters, and don't realize they are hating on a lot of legitimate people too. It's sad.

wrote:
There are two main events for the polyglot community: the Polyglot Conference and the Polyglot Gathering.

Thanks for explaining the difference between the gathering and the conference. I need to go to one of these!

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Philipp wrote:
Hey coming back to this topic. For russian<->german the only dictionaries available are russian wiktionary and wordreference (which translates to english btw).
Could you please add these dictionaries that translate to actual german
https://de.langenscheidt.com/russisch-deutsch/слово
https://dict.leo.org/russisch-deutsch/слово
https://de.pons.com/%C3%BCbersetzung/russisch-deutsch/слово

Added!

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

There is a lot of interesting discussion here regarding learning methodology, but I often find myself thinking “that won’t work very well for hard language”. I chalk up this feeling to the variety of languages I learn. I was just wondering if there are any like minded people out there, so I created the poll.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

No we have not, but if you know of anyone who would like to do this, feel free to give them our contact information.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

bbyj wrote:
When you tap "Terms and conditions", it doesn't open anything

Hi there. Could you PM me a screencast of this?

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

bbyj wrote:
Will there be a dark mode added to the app?

We have no immediate plans for it, but maybe this topic will help.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

bbyj wrote:
noticed two bugs in Android app. 1.) When you tap "Terms and conditions", it doesn't open anything. 2.) Importing YouTube videos does not bring over the subtitles. Passage is empty

Thanks for you input, and sorry about those issues. Regarding 1) - how did you access that? I select the little down arrow at the bottom of the screen beneath Language Tools, then select terms and conditions at the bottom of the menu, and it displays properly. If this is what you are doing, can you tell me your android version/browser? 2) We are already working a ticket on this; hopefully it will be done in the next week or two.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

GermanPolyglot wrote:
For language learners, spending even an hour on learning the basics of the International Phonetic Alphabet is a great investment

Although I agree with this, I keep procrastinating. I may run out of languages before I get around to it.  

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

GermanPolyglot wrote:
Most publishers of travel phrasebooks appear to think that I should learn how to book a room at a hotel, how to exchange foreign currency, how to explain a car emergency and so on. In my experience, these are not the kind of phrases that will lead to an unforgettable vacation.

I agree. Phrasebooks were commonplace for travelers and language learners for a long time - maybe 100 years? It's kind of sad they are going away, but I don't see how they can keep up with programs like Google Translate. I mean, you don't even have to look things up any more - just talk into it, and it repeats the phrase in the foreign language. So advanced! 


I do have some fond memories of phrase books though. For example, when I joined the Peace Corps in 1999 I had a Swahili phrasebook. I memorized it before going to Africa, and it really helped!

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Sounds good! I'm going to close this ticket then. 

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Philipp wrote:
Personally I'd like to have the en.wiktionary.com available even when I have set "show translations in" to german but I would understand if that would not make sense to you.

We talked about this, and decided not to implement it because it would be strange to have a Russian-English dictionary available for German definitions. Also, the user might forget and add English definitions instead of German which could affect others.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Philipp wrote:
Personally I'd like to have the en.wiktionary.com available even when I have set "show translations in" to german but I would understand if that would not make sense to you.

We will discuss this.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Philipp wrote:
Thank you. Should I immediately be able to see it? So far it shows only the two old ones.
I can see it. What is your os/browser? (I can see 4 dictionaries for Russian)

Edited

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Philipp wrote:
I need the English Wiktionary for Russian
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/слово

Added

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

OMartin wrote:
I don’t know if this thread is for feedback on the Android or iOS version of the app, but I’m using the iOS version and the button for the dictionary is not working (which makes the Reading Tool mostly useless, honestly) maybe because the default behavior in the web version is to open another tab with wordreference.com but there’s no tabs in the iOS app.

The thread is for both. Sorry about this problem. Ticket written.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Ok, we discussed them. 

1) The playlist media player allows you to click and drag a dot to whatever location you want on the recording, plus there are forward and rewind buttons that go in 10 sec increments. 

2 & 3) Per your post, I assume 1) takes care of you, but the tech team mentioned the files within the apps space so you don't need internet access after the initial syncing.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Thanks - I forwarded your suggestions to the tech team.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

StewartLikesOPLingo wrote:
I'm trying to use this website and switch over from LingQ but I noticed right away there are no keyboard shortcuts to make marking words Known or Ignored right away, nor a way to go to the next word with the arrow keys. Please add this ability or let me know if it's a feature I don't know how to do yet. Thanks!

Welcome back Stewart. We don't have these features. Can you describe in detail how you would like these to work? Like, which keys would you like for shortcuts, and would you want all four arrow keys to work?

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Joseph.Adams wrote:
- If the playlist media player, could forward/rewind currently it just jumps from beginning to end.
- If Media Files (such as Language Conversations) could be downloaded straight from the app. The only reason I download item is due to my first point that I cannot rewind or forward.
- Or a better alternative to the point above is If the playlist could exist offline - tracks downloaded locally, so I could listen to my playlist with or without internet access.

Ok - we will discuss these

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Joseph.Adams wrote:
But My only grudges are that I can't listen to my playlist when I come off the app or when my screen locks - Annoying that I have to stay on the app to keep my playlist going.
Also I know the mobile app is essentially the website but if there was a way to have Audio/Playlist control from my notifications (play, pause, next, time position) that would be amazing too

There is now a ticket out for both of these.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Philipp wrote:
I personally find the unknown words saved to my vocabulary kind of useless but it also doesn't really hurt since I can just ignore it.

After further discussion, I've decided not to do this for the time being. If it gains interest in the future, we may reconsider.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Joseph.Adams wrote:
But My only grudges are that I can't listen to my playlist when I come off the app or when my screen locks - Annoying that I have to stay on the app to keep my playlist going.
Also I know the mobile app is essentially the website but if there was a way to have Audio/Playlist control from my notifications (play, pause, next, time position) that would be amazing too

Thanks for the input Joseph. I wrote a ticket for your first item, and we will discuss your second one.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Thanks Rainer! We appreciate it.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Yeah, I might want to do this myself, so I'll keep the ticket open. They may make it an admin tool, rather than double confirm, so the user has to request it.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Hi Philipp,

You are talking about a bulk "change of state" option in the vocabulary list, right? (There isn't a delete option, but you can change a word's state back to unknown.)

Edit - I have enquired about this in a ticket.

Edited

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Hi Everyone,

We have re-designed our mobile App from the ground up, and would like your feedback. Please post your input here, and we will work to fix problems as quickly as possible.

Thanks for your support!

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Does plain google TTS sound the same as google TTS through languagecrush?

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Jinx wrote:
Has anyone else noticed this? Any idea why it's happening all of a sudden?

sorry about that Jinx. I haven't noticed it, but I am using chrome/windows 10/desktop, listening to the TTS and comparing it to the TTS in google translate. Is that what you are doing? You said that you verified your speakers by playing audio on other sites, but I would like to point out that, unless you are listening to their version of google TTS, it is not an apples-to-apples comparison. It is also possible that the default voice you are using in the reading tool has changed, and might not match the google default voice. You can change them by going to settings>override default voice (within a passage). 

Edited

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

It was pointed out to me that this already exists. Sort by total words.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

Ok. I'll write a ticket to discuss it.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

leosmith wrote:
Regarding automatically ignoring every word/letter in a language that actually belongs to another language, that would be pretty hard to implement, but I'll write a ticket to discuss this with the tech team in case I'm wrong. The work around here, if it is important enough to you, is to ignore the foreign words yourself.

The tech team came back and confirmed that it would be too difficult to implement. Please do the suggested work around in these cases.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

We can look at this again when the new app is released. For the time being, please just use your work around.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

To clarify, you are asking to sort by unknown words, correct?

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

A.L. wrote:
I'm attaching an example. I added red marks to the image pointing to some of them, they appear as grey rectangles.

It appears to be the black screen that's causing problems. We don't support users modifying the sites css, and we don't have a black screen with white text at the moment. When I create a Hebrew passage, spaces and such are not treated as separate words. 

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

A.L. wrote:
Haha no, the grey rectangles aren't too bad, but pink or green is a bit much! They're only grey because I ignored them once I realized what was going on. I can only imagine how distracting it could be for someone else.
Oops, my bad! I've rephrased my question to the tech team.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

A.L. wrote:
That's exactly it, they won't "show" because they are blank spaces and newlines. I'm attaching an example. I added red marks to the image pointing to some of them, they appear as grey rectangles. If you highlight the text in my previous comment, you should see that they are in fact there, just invisible.

Highlighting doesn't make them show up, so thanks for the screenshot. So you are saying that you don't like grey rectangles showing up in place of spaces, carriage returns, etc - right? I will try to find out why that was done.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

A.L. wrote:
I will write them again, starting with the square bracket (non-inclusive), ending with the / (inclusive) with no additional spaces, newlines or otherwise.
You should find a space, a space+ newline, and of course /
רגע, אולי אם אכתוב בעברית לפני זה יעבוד
[ ‫
‫/

Ok, I think I understand what you are saying now. You are typing some examples of characters that should be ignored, but they aren't appearing in your post right? I only see [ and / with nothing in between. Maybe a screen shot showing them in your vocab list or in a passage?


Regarding automatically ignoring every word/letter in a language that actually belongs to another language, that would be pretty hard to implement, but I'll write a ticket to discuss this with the tech team in case I'm wrong. The work around here, if it is important enough to you, is to ignore the foreign words yourself.


You can fix typos by editing a passage (if it's yours) or copying then editing a passage if it's not yours. 


If you can't find a definition for a word anywhere, you may have a typo, or if it's that important to you, you may need to improve your bag of tricks for finding them. For example, you can swipe a phrase to see if the meaning pops up in the middle (when it doesn't pop up for the single word). You can google it and sometimes get the correct meaning from bits of articles that come up, or from google images. 


It is probably best to be happy with less than perfect wordlists though. The ultimate goal, after all, is to acquire the language, not to have a flawless list. I use lots of tools, and none of them are perfect, but they still get me where I want to go.

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Posts1492Likes995Joined18/3/2018LocationPattaya / TH
Native
English
Learning Chinese - Mandarin
Other French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Thai

I just heard back from the tech team, and they reminded me that there are many issues with the app, so the work-around is to use the browser on the phone for the time being (our new release target for the app is in May). They don't know why normal audio wasn't playing for you, as it's a browser feature that we're using. Could you try on chrome proper? (they were not sure what brave is)

Posted

I'm reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen.

Feedback